B&W landscapes on film

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B&W landscapes on film

Postby radar on Tue Feb 10, 2009 10:16 pm

Okay, some more film questions :D, must be that time of year.

I've managed to borrow a Linhof Technika. I think it's a Master Technika but not sure exactly. I have a Rodenstock 75mm and 150mm lenses, cable release and 120 film back (gives me 6x12 pano).

Reading various articles on the web, I found some good reviews of Ilford FP4+ for landscape photography. For colour, I'll also be taking some Velvia.

Are there any other b&w film that I should look at? I've followed Patrick's thread here. Tri-X looks good but for landscape, wouldn't I be better served by a slower speed film?

I plan to take it on a trip along the Great Ocean Road, those apostles don't move much so it should leave me plenty of time to get setup :lol:

I don't have any 4x5 filmholders, so I'll have to try sheet film some other time, unless I can borrow some.

Enough for tonight, any help appreciated,

Cheers,

André
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Re: B&W landscapes on film

Postby robert on Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:16 am

I havent used film in a few years but i had a few I liked.

I have read that Ilford SFX is back and its a 'quasi' Infrared film, just a lot easier to handle than kodak HIE. you still need to use an IR filter but the results are great and a lot smoother and less grainier than the kodak.

For general B+W i always liked the ilford delta- 100 or 400, definately finer grained than most others. And always had good old Tri-X on hand cos the grain really adds to the feel.

If you havent got your developing times well practiced, HP5 has such a large exposure lattitude that you will definately be able to print even with a slight prob with developing times.

As far as fine grain goes- the larger format is a bit forgiving so dont stress too much- esp such a big neg. Do you have a 5x4 enlarger or are you going to scan the film and print via PC?

Yuo may also want to read up about using movement to increase depth of field without changing aperture, not sure of the movements on the linhof, but I almost always tilted the front lens downward a little to increase DOF.

Good luck, its a cool, slow and creative process- I just love looking at the big ground glass (once you get used tyo it being upside down)

Robert
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Re: B&W landscapes on film

Postby radar on Wed Feb 11, 2009 10:27 am

robert wrote:I havent used film in a few years but i had a few I liked.


lot of years here as well and only 35mm.

I have read that Ilford SFX is back and its a 'quasi' Infrared film, just a lot easier to handle than kodak HIE. you still need to use an IR filter but the results are great and a lot smoother and less grainier than the kodak.

For general B+W i always liked the ilford delta- 100 or 400, definately finer grained than most others. And always had good old Tri-X on hand cos the grain really adds to the feel.


thanks for that.

If you havent got your developing times well practiced, HP5 has such a large exposure lattitude that you will definately be able to print even with a slight prob with developing times.


I'll be getting a friend to help me with this.

As far as fine grain goes- the larger format is a bit forgiving so dont stress too much- esp such a big neg. Do you have a 5x4 enlarger or are you going to scan the film and print via PC?


Scanning and print via Mac.

Yuo may also want to read up about using movement to increase depth of field without changing aperture, not sure of the movements on the linhof, but I almost always tilted the front lens downward a little to increase DOF.


been doing lots of reading, lots to learn but also lots of fun.

Good luck, its a cool, slow and creative process- I just love looking at the big ground glass (once you get used tyo it being upside down)


Certainly very different then a DSLR 8)

Cheers,

André
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Re: B&W landscapes on film

Postby gstark on Wed Feb 11, 2009 11:43 am

André,

If you're shooting sheet film, you're really missing out on the best part of using this sort of gear. DDSs are only about PP10 each or so, so it may be worth trying to buy a few. 5 will give you 10 exposures, which, given the deliberate nature of how one shoots with these types of cameras, will be ample for a ton of fun.

You may also want to consider some sheet film using the E6 process. There's little that matches a nice big slide.

robert wrote:Yuo may also want to read up about using movement to increase depth of field without changing aperture, not sure of the movements on the linhof, but I almost always tilted the front lens downward a little to increase DOF.


Scheimpflug Principle is what you should Google. It's way col. :)

Good luck, its a cool, slow and creative process- I just love looking at the big ground glass (once you get used tyo it being upside down)


:agree:
g.
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Re: B&W landscapes on film

Postby radar on Wed Feb 11, 2009 12:18 pm

Gary,
gstark wrote:If you're shooting sheet film, you're really missing out on the best part of using this sort of gear. DDSs are only about PP10 each or so, so it may be worth trying to buy a few. 5 will give you 10 exposures, which, given the deliberate nature of how one shoots with these types of cameras, will be ample for a ton of fun.


Found some from my friend that lent me the camera :D

You may also want to consider some sheet film using the E6 process.


Will look into it, thanks.

Scheimpflug Principle is what you should Google. It's way col. :)


Been there :up:

Found Merklinger's photo books very useful.

Cheers,

André
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